Smartmockups

February 27, 2016 0 comments

Tired of downloading behemoth PSD files, edit your screenshots manually, and export the image for a mockup shot?

Tired no more with Smartmockups!

Smartmockups is a new online tool for all designers, marketers and developers out there. With our curated collection of the best free product mockups you can present your design like a boss!

What UX designers can learn from CSI

June 27, 2015 0 comments

Nothing! It’s just a TV show about crime investigations.

There are too many superficial “articles” lately trying to draw “lessons” from unrelated topics.

The juxtaposition does turn the title into a clickbait and we can safely say that there are enough of this already.

The Unexpected Survival Of Letterpress

June 2, 2015 0 comments

What makes the 19th century printing technology still being use today? This documentary about the survival of letterpress and the remarkable printers who preserve the history and knowledge of the craft has just raised a Kickstarter fund. Can’t wait to watch the film.

SpaceX Mars Posters

May 21, 2015 0 comments

Space X, the brain child of Elon Musk has just released a set of awesome vintage travel posters.

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See the rest of them here. They are all released with Creative Common 0 (free for commercial and personal use)

 

 

5 Rules for a Creative Culture

March 23, 2015 1 comment

This is awesome and brilliant. From Mailchimp SEO, Ben Chestnut. Catch the original article here.

1. Avoid rules. Avoid order. Don’t just embrace chaos, but create a little bit of it. Constant change, from the top-down, keeps people nimble and flexible (and shows that you want constant change).

2. Give yourself and your team permission to be creative. Permission to try something new, permission to fail, permission to embarrass yourself, permission to have crazy ideas.

3. Hire weird people. Not just the tattoo’d and pierced-in-strange-places kind, but people from outside your industry who would approach problems in different ways than you and your normal competitors.

4. Meetings are a necessary evil, but you can avoid the conference room and meet people in the halls, the water cooler, or their desks. Make meetings less about delegation and task management and more about cross-pollination of ideas (especially the weird ideas). This is a lot harder than centralized, top-down meetings. But this is your job — deal with it.

5. Structure your company to be flexible. Creativity is often spontaneous, so the whole company needs to be able to pivot quickly and execute on them (see #1).

Treehouse vs Code School vs Codecademy: Quick comparison

February 9, 2015 0 comments

The never-ending debate of whether designer should code is getting hotter and hotter now with the emergence of many coding schools like Treehouse, Code School and Codecademy, not to mention thousands of free coding tutorials from blogs like CSS-Tricks and the official W3School.

I’ve spent a pretty good time on each ‘school’ to test out what they have to offer and which one best suit my learning style before I subscribe to the premium plan.

Let’s go through a quick comparison between the three 🙂

Code School

Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 5.25.06 PM

Pros:

  • Starting from: $29 per month
  • For advanced beginner or intermediate level
  • More interactive ( nice illustrations!)
  • Better hands-on and exercise

Cons:

  • Fewer courses
  • Quite hard for beginners

Codecademy

Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 5.27.06 PM

Pros:

  • Free!
  • Very little courses
  • Good for beginners
  • Very hands-on

Cons:

  • Pretty basic and simple
  • Quite buggy sometimes
  • No video content

Treehouse

Screen Shot 2015-02-09 at 5.30.38 PM

Pros:

  • Starting from $25 per month
  • Well explained videos
  • Tonnes of learning modules with more actively added
  • Friendlier UI

Cons:

  • Some unfunny jokes in the videos
  • Some content are too basic, but skippable
  • Less hands-on
  • Less challenging exercise with no hint!

 

In the end, I chose to subscribe to Treehouse because programming is not my forte and I do find some of the courses in Code School are quite tough to follow if you don’t have the basics.

Plus Treehouse is cheaper.

However, Codecademy is the best if you are a complete newbie and just want to get the feel of coding since it’s totally free to start out.

note: referral links

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